Categories
Case Study

Seaward Way

Summary

A scheme of 54 new zero carbon in operation homes, all with affordable rent for Somerset West & Taunton Council.

Due to start on site winter 2021, the project has ambitious energy performance targets, working towards the LETI definition of net zero. Low carbon technologies including PV panels, thermal storage with smart controllers and air source heat pumps will be installed with 100% of predicted total operational energy generated on site.

Key information

  • Client: Somerset West and Taunton Council
  • Developer: Somerset West and Taunton Council
  • Architects: Mitchells/APG Architecture
  • Contractor: Classic Builders (SW) Ltd
  • Location: Minehead, Somerset
  • Engineers/consultants: Hydrock/GCP/Expedite Engineers
  • Employers agents: Gates Consultants
  • Principal Designer: Gates Consultants
  • Clerk of Works: Gates Consultants
  • Project type: New-build
  • Number of homes: 54, ranging from 1-4 bed
  • Sector: Social Housing
  • Key dates: Pre-construction services agreement commences August 2021, Start on site Winter 2021, Completion Summer 2023

Key facts/highlights

  • Ambitious targets, using LETI definition of net zero
  • Zero operational carbon through the use of low carbon technologies
  • Monitoring data will be taken and analysed by University of Bath
  • High performance insulation and glazing
  • Air tightness <1 m³/h/m² @50Pa
  • Accessible units
  • All units are affordable rent

Energy performance

  • 100% of predicted total operational energy generated on site via solar PV
  • Energy Use Intensity (EUI) target: <35 kWh/m²/yr (LETI)
  • Space heating demand target: <15 kWh/m²/yr (Passivhaus)
  • U value targets:
    • Roof: <0.10 W/m²K
    • Ground floor: <0.10 W/m²K
    • Walls: <0.13 W/m²K
    • Windows: 0.80 W/m²K (triple glazing), g-value 0.50-0.60
  • Air tightness target: <1 m³/h/m² @50Pa
  • Performance gap mitigated with employment of energy and carbon consultant

Monitoring data will be collected by the main contractor, with the University of Bath (Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering) who will collect and analyse the data.

Whole life carbon/resource efficiency

  • Embodied carbon target: <500kg CO²e/m² 
  • Environmental Product Declarations (EPD) required for all building elements
  • 30% if materials are reused
  • 50% of materials are reusable
  • Green Euro water labels for hot water outlets

The main contractor will undertake pre and post-construction review of the associated embodied carbon emissions related to the development through data gathering on-site. This will be verified by Hydrock, post-completion. 

EPD will be used to verify embodied carbon content of at least the substructure, frame and upper floor, post-construction. Where available for other building components, this will be also be incorporated into the post-construction embodied carbon assessment.

Materials and construction

  • Porotherm block system, a modern clay brick with virtually dry construction
  • Permarock Brick Slip System
  • Permarock render cladding system RAL 9002
  • Aluminium balcony frame with aluminium floor and perforated balustrade RAL 5025
  • Natural roof slate
  • UPVC fascia, guttering and rainwater hoods in black

EV charging

All houses will have EV charging points, with up to 8 communal charging points for apartment units.

Thermal comfort and resilience

CIBSE AM11, compliant Dynamic Thermal Modelling to assess overheating following CIBSE TM59, Design methodology for the assessment of overheating risk in homes.

Access to green space and amenities

  • Balconies or terraces for all flats
  • Gardens for each house
  • Communal space with play area, landscaped bunds and attenuation pond
  • The site is 50m from the bus stop
  • Amenities including hospital and town centre between 5 and 15 minutes walking distance
  • Cycleway connection from the site

Inclusivity

3 units are designed to be wheelchair accessible.

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Case Study

Knights Park

Summary

Knights Park is a distinctive exemplar of a zero-carbon neighbourhood, providing 249 homes that extend the city in a sustainable way. The project is zero-carbon both in terms of its operational CO² and sitewide sustainable infrastructure. Part of Eddington, this is a truly “15-minute” walkable neighbourhood designed for a wide demographic.

The 249 homes have been designed fabric first and have ambitious energy targets, which meet Code for Sustainable Homes Level 5. With a raft of awards Knights Park is an impressive project with both sustainability and community in mind. 

Key information

  • Client: Hill
  • Developer: Hill
  • Architects: Pollard Thomas Edwards and Alison Brooks Architects
  • Location: Cambridge
  • Engineers/consultants: DW Pointer and Partners (M&E), Bailey Garner (Sustainability)
  • Number of homes: 249
  • Sector: Private
  • Key dates: 2013-current
  • Construction cost: £52 million

Key Highlights

  • Zero carbon neighbourhood
  • 15-minute walkable neighbourhood
  • Code for Sustainable Homes level 5
  • Fabric first approach with Passivhaus principles in mind (uncertified)
  • PV panels to provide 100% of regulated energy demand on-site 
  • Blue-green infrastructure with district heating network and underground waste and recycling scheme
  • Community facilities 

Awards

  • British Homes Awards 2020: Sustainable Development of the Year
  • Evening Standard New Homes Award 2020: Development of Outstanding Architectural – Merit
  • What House? Award 2019: Best Sustainable Development – Gold
  • What House? Award 2019: Best House – Silver (The Avenue House)
  • What House? Award 2019: Best Development – Silver
  • Evening Standard New Homes Award 2019: Eco-Living
  • Housing Design Project Award 2016
  • Housing Design Award 2021: Building with Nature

Energy performance

  • Space heating demand target: 39 and 46 kWh/m²/yr (FEES)
  • U values:
    • Wall -0.1 W/m²K
    • Roof – 0.1 W/m²K
    • Floor – 0.115 W/m²K
    • Windows: U-0.89 W/m²K, G-0.5
  • Air tightness: 3.50 m³/h/m² @50Pa
  • Designed to meet Code for Sustainable Homes Level 5
  • Solar panels on east-facing roofs
  • Mechanical Ventilation and Heat Recovery (MVHR)
  • District heat network (CHP) and HIU
  • No thermal bridging at building junctions
  • 500mm insulation in the roofs
  • 300mm insulation in walls

Post-occupancy evaluation is planned for 2022/23, two years after completion. This is to review the scheme after some time in use. Resident surveys and interviews are planned to assess performance. 

Whole life carbon/resource efficiency

  • 15% (by volume) of construction materials to be from reused and recycled materials
  • Compliance with BES6001 (responsible sourcing of construction products)
  • Non-potable water supplied to each home for WC and irrigation

Materials and construction

  • Traditional construction methods
  • Use of low VOC paints and internal finishes

Thermal comfort and resilience

Use of CIBSE TM52 thermal comfort analysis test.

Community and accessibility

The overall masterplan is a fine-grained urban grid, built with high enough densities to encourage walking and social connections, with shared surfaces and car-free landscaped streets. 

The plan includes a community centre, shops, hotel and a school all within the 15-minute walkable neighbourhood. 

Quotes

David Birkbeck, Awards Director, Housing Design Awards 2021

“This summer we’ve seen many examples of climate change bringing tropical downpours. This is the first scheme in Britain with a strategy to make sure those cloudbursts don’t soak through under your front door. It’s an exemplar of designing for climate change with a 360 degree vision, such as its clever ventilation strategies so homes won’t overheat, now a real issue for nearly all new-builds. If I were buying a new home and worrying about climate change and how that would affect my comfort in my home, I’d be confident Knights Park wouldn’t leave me sweltering at night.”

Dr Gemma Jerome, Director, Building with Nature

“Our quality standards have been created to award projects at both the design and post-construction stages of development. Given that Knights Park is already built and occupied, meaning their planning application came forward before much of the current environmental and climate legislation was in place, we were super impressed with the high standard and holistic design approach evident across the scheme. Knights Park delivers a new neighbourhood which will act as a benchmark for development for years to come. Without compromising on the design quality of the built environment, Knights Park successfully demonstrates what is possible when a scheme positively responds to the climate and ecological emergency, meeting the needs of both the existing and future local communities.”

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Case Study

Hurst Close MMC Demonstration Project

Summary

A demonstration project of two ‘flat pack’ homes built using a standardised platform kit-of-parts, delivered to site without the need for a heavy goods vehicle and assembled by a semi-skilled and diverse contractor team.

The 3-bedroom homes have been designed and built to achieve Passivhaus standards (uncertified), to be maintenance-free externally for thirty years, have low running costs and be available for social affordable rent.

The project was one of several small-scale projects commissioned by the London Borough of Ealing who were seeking to explore a range of MMC solutions.

Key information

  • Client: Ealing Council
  • Developer: Buildeco Offsite Architecture
  • Sub-contractor: B-Line
  • Architects: C.F.Moller Architects UK
  • Location: Northolt, Ealing
  • Engineers/consultants: Conisbee Consulting Engineers, XCO2 Energy, Butler & Young Associates (M&E)
  • Panel Manufacturer: GMOC
  • Project type: New-build
  • Number of homes: 2
  • Sector: Social Housing
  • Key dates: Handover – 16th November 2020

Key facts/highlights

  • Whole life carbon calculation of the building taken from the extraction of raw materials through to manufacturing, transport, assembly, operational use, end of life and disassembly
  • At the end of the buildings life, the system is reconfigurable to form other types of buildings
  • Fabric first approach with Passivhaus principles (not certified)
  • Reduced foundation costs, due to lighter building weight
  • Building assembled within ± 1mm
  • Site assembly by hand by a diverse, trained, multitask workforce
  • Delivered entirely in ‘white vans’, removing use for an articulated lorry
  • Achieved EPC ‘B’ without renewables, with renewables has the potential to achieve EPC ‘A’

Energy performance

  • Energy Use Intensity (EUI): 53 kWh/m²/yr
  • EPC rating: B
  • Space heating demand: 22.7 kWh/m²/yr
  • Dwelling Fabric Energy Efficiency (DFEE): 42.3 kWh/m²/yr
  • U values:
    • Roof – 0.14 W/m²K
    • Ground floor – 0.13 W/m²K
    • Suspended floor – 0.16 W/m²K
    • Walls – 0.14-0.15 W/m²K
    • Door – 0.45 W/m²K 
    • Windows vary between 0.8-1.6 W/m²K, g-value 0.52-0.64
  • The tenant reported that to date their monthly bill in the coldest winter month was just £23
  • MVHR installed

Whole life carbon/resource efficiency

  • The buildings can be disassembled at end of life, with panels being able to be reused and reconfigured. It is designed in such a way it can be disassembled in reverse order
  • Use of MMC to minimise material waste
  • Carbon reductions of between 30-50% were achieved due to the lightweight structure requiring shallower foundations and fewer site deliveries
  • Only 2 skips were used for waste material throughout project delivery

Materials and construction

The UK manufactured panels of the build system are constructed from non-combustible materials, Light Gauge Steel (LGS) & Magnesium Oxide boards (MgO boards), and the assembly of the panels is within ± 1mm and the overhaul dimensions of the building when assembled is within ± 2mm in all directions.

  • Floor, walls, ceiling and roof panels are almost identical
  • The building components do not use any nuts, bolts or screws and the whole building is assembled using one tool
  • To assemble the full superstructure from ground level to roof took a total of 28 man-days in three phases

EV charging

There is provision for a 32amp single phase charging point.

Thermal comfort and resilience

  • CIBSE TM52 compliance
  • Energy-efficient lighting
  • Solar control glazing

Access to green space and amenities

  • 120/150m² private rear gardens
  • 250m to the local bus stop
  • Shops within walking distance

Safety and security

The scheme complies with Secured by Design.

Scalability/buildability

The system is a standardised and is scalable using Panelised MMC category 2 (Pre-Manufacturing – 2D primary structural systems), which can then be designed to any size.

Quotes

David Baptiste, Head of Housing Development, Ealing Council

“The project was completed to a high quality build and energy standard which is endorsed both by the development department and residents living in the accommodation.”

Robert Turner, Project Officer, Ealing Council

“The Quality of the finished produce was excellent – better than the other demonstration projects, it achieved the promised thermal performance, the buildings are contemporary and attractive, and they are constructed from materials and using techniques that will minimise long term maintenance.”

Further information and images

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Case Study

Manor Farm

Summary

Construction of 7 new dwellings and conversion of a historic farmhouse into student/staff accommodation in the grounds of the University of Surrey, Guildford, due to start on-site September 2021.

The project is designed to be a model development to showcase the integration of smart home technology in both new buildings and retrofitting a complicated existing building, which is classed as a “local heritage asset”. The brief is to construct outstanding sustainable buildings which can adapt to students’ and staff’s changing needs and can be scaled up for future developments as required.

The materials chosen for the design have been done with consideration for sustainable sourcing as well as whole life carbon, as well as making use of solar panels and ground source heat pumps.

There will be an emphasis on ecology, arboriculture and archaeology due to the site’s proximity to a scheduled ancient monument.

Good Homes Alliance will revisit this dynamic case study through the build and monitoring process, updating with key information and and lessons learned throughout the journey. 

Key information

  • Client: University of Surrey
  • Developer: My Global Home
  • Architects/designer and contractor: Jane Hepworth/Mark di Cecco (in house)
  • Location: University of Surrey, Guildford
  • Project type: New build and conversion of the existing building
  • Number of homes: 7 new builds, 2 dwellings within farmhouse
  • Sector: Student/staff accommodation.
  • Key dates: Due to start on site September 2021

Key facts and highlights

  • Smart home technology for new build and retrofit
  • Ambitious sustainability targets
  • Energy and heat provided by solar panels and ground source heat pumps
  • New builds make use of MMC
  • Scalable modules can be repeated vertically and horizontally
  • Standalone development with regard to services
  • Surface water drainage capture for use in irrigation
  • Landscaping to create a sense of place for study and meeting outdoors

Energy performance

  • Energy Use Intensity target (EUI): 35 kWh/m²/yr (LETI)
  • Space heating demand target: 15kWh/m²/yr (LETI)
  • SAP rating target: SAP 100
  • EPC rating target: EPC A
  • U-values
    • Walls 0.13 W/m²K
    • Floor  0.08 W/m²K
    • Roof 0.10 W/m²K
    • Doors 1.00 W/m²K
    • Windows 0.08 W/m²K, G value: 0.5
  • Air tightness target 0.6 m³/hr/m² @50Pa
  • Thermal bridging target (Y value): 0.04W/m²K
  • MVHR with 90% efficiency for the new buildings. Currently not possible for the farmhouse conversion
  • Aiming for PV panels to supply 100% of the electricity demand, with a battery storage backup

Whole life carbon and resource efficiency

  • Embodied carbon target: 450kgCO²e/m²
  • Full whole life carbon assessment to be carried out once construction materials are confirmed
  • Surface water and water from roofs to be used for irrigation 
  • Greywater harvesting for use in WC’s
  • Only WC water waste to be discharged into main drains, limiting demand on existing infrastructure
  • Ground source heat pump with SCoP rating 4
  • Appointment of sustainability/energy consultant with an ongoing monitoring role
  • Full Life Cycle Assessment will be made available on completion of the project

Materials and construction

The design has been awarded to two modular contractors to compare the methodologies as this is a demonstrator site.

The first method (one storey) is constructed using panels fitted together on-site – walls, floor and roof. This allows us to crane the complicated “Core” (circular sensory room in the centre) into place during assembly. This is an acoustically sensitive room, and its performance is critical.

The second method is a complete off-site construction approach, where the building (two storeys) will arrive in only 2 sections per floor.

Modular buildings will make use of timber sandwich panels between 360mm and 425mm thick and the exterior will be render, timber panelling or brick slips, with further materials being specified once planning is approved. 

EV charging

This is a no-car zone (in line with the University of Surrey’s policy). 4 EV points will be provided off-site for disabled parking. 

Thermal comfort and resilience

  • TM59 calculation to be carried out once building materials are finalised
  • Good Homes Alliance  Overheating guidance assessment
  • Low e-glass
  • The design will incorporate window shades, cross ventilation and high ceilings
  • Heat recapture from bathrooms and kitchens and re-distributed to living rooms and bedrooms (via MVHR)
  • 2050 London Heathrow weather file from Prometheus project will be used for assessment once materials have been confirmed (subject to planning approval)

Access to green space and amenities

  • The development is part of the wider university landscape, with access to green spaces, ponds, sports facilities
  • The university provides infrastructure to support students and staff with healthcare

Biodiversity and microclimate adaption

  • 20.7% net gain in Bio-diversity quantified by Lindsay Carrington Ecological Services
  • Hard surfaces are porous to aid surface water drainage
  • Hard surfaces are kept to a minimum
  • High albedo rating, 8/10 rating or higher (using lighter colours and avoiding asphalt & concrete)
  • Surrounding grass is retained

Safety and security

  • A consultation meeting with the local Crime Prevention Officer is scheduled once planning approval has been secured
  • PV-powered external lighting 

Scalability and buildability

  • Designed to be modular and scalable
  • Two blank external walls to allow additional units to be incorporated
  • Modular construction to allow each model to be mass-produced
  • Moveable internal walls to allow flexibility depending on annually changing occupants
  • Storage units are all modular and reconfigurable

Accessibility and space standards

  • A space standards matrix was completed as part of planning submission to ensure rooms comply with national standards
  • All ground floor apartments have been designed to be M4(3): Category 3: Wheelchair User Dwellings
  • All first-floor apartments have been designed to M4(2): Category 2: Accessible & Adaptable Dwellings
  • The ground floor of the farmhouse (conversion) has been designed to M4(1): Category 1: Visitable Dwellings

Quotes

Jane Hepworth, Head of Architecture, MyGlobalHome

“An exemplar project to showcase homes of the future; flexible, modular and smart, with an overriding emphasis on sustainable sourcing, construction and end of life recycling”.

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Case Study

Kiss House component based building system

Summary

Kiss House are developing a multi-storey single dwelling Passivhaus construction system, allowing the rapid on-site assembly of high specification homes using low-complexity, repeatable and clean methods.

The system is intended to be scalable and initially, a series of front runner projects will be constructed to prove the concept.

The Kiss House team were experts in best practice low energy construction. Their background was in bespoke one-off housing. Whilst bespoke house builds can lead the way in terms of innovation, they are generally highly inefficient as they require a project team to reinvent the wheel every time. They are like prototyping exercises, never really to be repeated.  Kiss House wanted to find a vehicle to transfer all the lessons they’d learned. 

Key information

  • Client: Various
  • Developer: Kiss House
  • Architect/Designer: Kiss House
  • Location: Multiple
  • Engineers/consultants: Kiss House
  • Project Type: New build
  • Number of homes: 1-10
  • Sector: Private Housing
  • Key dates: Handover – Start date late 2021

Key facts/highlights

Kiss House have created a building system that can:

  • Achieve Passivhaus certification
  • Be low in embodied energy
  • Work across different geographical locations.
  • Be configured into different housing typologies
  • Easy to erect
  • Use natural materials
  • component-based design for manufacture and assembly (DfMA) flexibly off-site
  • Be predominantly timber and using waste and native timber
  • Displace petrochemical-based products eg steel and concrete
  • Eliminate wet trades
  • Significantly reduce local distruption/traffic movements
  • Be measurable and adaptable
  • Enable a feedback loop for continual improvement and innovation
  • High embodied carbon materials are also excluded by design

Energy performance

Kiss House is using wall and floor sensors to monitor fabric performance and room sensors to monitor internal conditions. They will be collecting energy usage data to compare with predicted data. They are developing their own soft landings equivalent for this with a BPE partner. 

  • Energy Use Intensity (EUI): Building EUI inclusive of building-mounted renewables as required to achieve Passivhaus Plus certification is anticipated to be < 10kWh/m²/yr
  • EPC rating target: A
  • Environmental Impact Rating target: A
  • Space heating demand: As this project is being designed to meet Passivhaus Plus in a variety of locations and orientations, it should be capable of delivering lower space heating demand than 15 kWh/m2/yr
  • Heat pump:5 kW PUHZ_H_Monobloc ASHP with a SCoP of 3.18 for DHW & 4.01 for space heating
  • Dwelling Fabric Energy Efficiency target (DFEE): 32 kWh/m²K
  • Dwelling Emission Rate target (DER): -5.79 kgCO2/m²/yr (Net Zero Carbon)
  • U values: Area weighted U-value of opaque elements targeting 0.11 W/m²K
  • Air tightness: High performance triple glazing with Air tightness < 0.6 ACH @ 50 Pa (equivalent to ≈0.7 m³/h/m² @ 50 Pa)
  • PV will be sized to achieve Passivhaus Plus so will vary with location

Whole life carbon/resource efficiency

Kiss House uses product design industry CAD modelling technologies to develop the construction system in high granular detail that is constructed using off-site manufacture as a system of non-volumetric building materials. This reduces waste and allows high-density transportation. 

Material and process embodied carbon information is embedded in the building model, giving full transparency of carbon values for all components used in the construction system and allowing targeted component development to reduce environmental impact. High embodied carbon materials are also excluded by design.

Stages A1 to A3 ( from BS EN 15978) Embodied carbon data are embedded into product data to enable fast analysis of component level carbon.

Thermal comfort and resilience

  • Passivhaus PHPP frequency of overheating checks
  • CIBSE TM59 design methodology for the avoidance of overheating in homes

Healthy and non toxic materials

Kiss House is pursuing WELL certification.

International WELL Building Institute announced plans to enter the single-family home market in May this year. They have created a panel of experts to collaborate on establishing the standard and Kiss House anticipates adopting the standard as soon as it becomes available.

Scalability/buildability

  • The construction system allows a majority of building assembly to occur off-site
  • Highly detailed models enable precise purchasing of materials, reducing waste
  • The construction system is process specific and site activities are defined as part of the system
  • On-site activities are repeatable and building-agnostic (i.e. the processes on site are the same whatever the building format or size). 
  • One guiding principle is to always exceed minimal space requirements
  • Adaptability is inherent in the system due to non-load-bearing walls and easily accessible services

Quotes

Mike Jacob, Director of Product and Innovation, Kiss House

“We realised that to develop new product innovations we would have to engage in radical collaboration as a team; with academia and research institutions and with specialist skills and expertise within the wider industry.

It has been a steep learning curve for the last three years, we have evolved hugely as we’ve begun to understand and harness the power of product innovation and to decarbonise construction in our attempt to respond to the need for better housing.

Ultimately, we realised that the only way to achieve our goals and help change housing was to develop a new building.”

Further information and images

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Case Study

Connell Gardens

Summary

Wondrwall’s net-zero home solution aims to decarbonise houses to make sustainable, net zero homes and change the way that people use their energy.

Wondrwall and Keepmoat partnered to deliver a trial of the Connell Gardens Development as part of Manchester City Council’s regeneration plan for the Gorton area.

5 three-bedroom homes were built with improved fabric and incorporating the Wondrwall solutions with dual-aspect PV solar, hybrid inverter & battery storage, and home automation.

Gas based heating and hot water were specified to minimise risk to the tenants should there be a performance gap, however, the case study indicated that AI-powered, all-electric, net-zero homes using Wondrwall technology are achievable with minimal incremental build cost and low energy bills for the occupier.

Key information

  • Project team: Manchester City Council and Keepmoat
  • Location: West Gorton, Manchester
  • Project type: New build
  • Number of homes: 5
  • Sector: Affordable housing
  • Key dates: Completed February 2020

Key facts/highlights

  • Dual aspect solar PV, with hybrid inverter and battery
  • Light switches monitoring temperature, humidity, power, motion, luminosity and sound
  • Network of 100+ sensors to monitor habitual patterns
  • Plotting the optimal running of the home using machine learning and predictive modelling
  • Maximisation of renewable and off-peak energy.
  • Home automation, including lighting, heating, security, safety and entertainment
  • Home automation, including lighting, heating, security, safety and entertainment
  • Home automation controlled through Amazon Alexa and the Wondrwall app

Energy performance

  • Energy Use Intensity (EUI) target- 2185 kWh/yr (31 kWh/m2/yr) 
  • Energy Use Intensity (EUI): 32 kWh/m²/yr, below LETI net zero definition
  • EPC rating: A
  • Annual PV generation target – 2148 kWh/yr
  • Annual PV generation monitoring result – 2357 kWh/yr
  • Improved wall insulation at 0.24 W/m2K from Keepmoat standard building typology of 0.28 W/m2K
  • Annual energy cost reduction of £456 (88%)

Whole life carbon/resource efficiency

The homes have an annual carbon reduction of 884kg (based on typical Keepmoat homes in the development). 

Materials and construction

The houses are a typical brick and block construction. The aim of the demonstrator project was to highlight the effectiveness of the Wondrwall system with significant reductions in carbon emissions and especially in the running costs for the tenants without having to make deep and costly changes to the design of the homes.

Access to green space and amenities

Each house has a private garden. 

Quotes

Cllr Suzanne Richards, Executive Member for Housing and Regeneration at Manchester City Council

“To retrofit all our homes and ensure that our new build homes are going to be zero carbon by 2038. It means that we really have to start doing things right now. That’s why I’m really pleased to be at this development in West Gorton where they’re using smart technology to make the home low carbon and deal with some of the challenges that we’re going to be facing in the future so we can get homes down to zero carbon.”

Further information and images

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Video

Pathfinder Network meeting #3

The third meeting of the Pathfinder Network of Housing Associations. This is available to Pathfinder members only.

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Video

Video – Net Zero Housing and Green Finance

The third event in conjunction with our Build Net Zero Now campaign. 

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Video

Video – Expert Workshop: Electricity grid, networks and EV charging infrastructure

An event for local authorities and housing associations – Good Homes Alliance was joined by expert Marc Wynn, Director of Asset Utilities Ltd for an interactive workshop on housing development and the electricity grid.

During the workshop, we explored topics such as electrical networks, distribution network operator (DNO) engagement, grid constraints, EV charging infrastructure and capacity requirements for heat pumps.

We heard how the electricity network operates in order to provide an understanding of why there are grid connection issues and how excessive grid connection costs can derail EV and renewable energy projects.

Strategies and solutions were discussed to solve these ‘issues’ in order for an authority to deliver its projects – EV, renewable or domestic developments.

Presentations

Grid Solutions – Marc Wynn

DOWNLOAD

 

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Report

The future of SAP calculations

Making SAP fit for a Net Zero future

The team including CIBSE, Elementa, Levitt Bernstein, WSP, UCL, Clarion Housing Group and Etude has published a report on the future of SAP. The work makes recommendations on improving SAP and RdSAP so they are fit for Net Zero. The report was commissioned by The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS).

What is SAP and why does it need improving?

SAP is the calculation methodology used to estimate and regulate the energy and carbon performance of new homes and the existing housing stock across the United Kingdom, from small works to large new developments. It is a central tool for those developing, implementing and tracking policies on energy, fuel poverty and carbon emissions and is being used by the whole building industry. SAP outputs are also used to inform residents. Its importance cannot be overstated.

The team has worked over the last year on a report that summarises the issues that should be addressed in the next version of SAP to make it the best possible methodology by 2023-2024. These include current trends affecting housing, the energy system, technologies and innovations such as performance testing and verification.

The 25 recommendations are split into five areas.

1. Better align SAP/RdSAP and its strategic objectives
2. Improvements to the methodology
3. Improvements to SAP/RdSAP and its ecosystem for Net Zero
4. For a better evaluation of energy use
5. Support to decarbonisation of heat and electricity

Download the future of SAP report

Download the full Making SAP fit for Net Zero report

Download the future of SAP summary report